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Are tablet sales slowing down?

February 3, 2014

Tablet devices have become a major priority for many retailers. Business owners need to attract consumers to their online credit card payment processing pages - and many are accessing them via tablets.

Tablet devices have become a major priority for many retailers. Business owners need to attract consumers to their online credit card payment processing pages – and many are accessing them via tablets.

However, sales of the devices may be slowing down. A recent report from IDC noted that tablet sales – even as they reached 76.9 million units during the fourth quarter of 2013 – were slowing down significantly in terms of overall market growth. 

“It’s becoming increasingly clear that markets such as the U.S. are reaching high levels of consumer saturation and while emerging markets continue to show strong growth this has not been enough to sustain the dramatic worldwide growth rates of years past,” said Tom Mainelli, Research Director, Tablets, at IDC.

However, there are still a large amount of tablets being sold in a general sense: IDC found that worldwide tablet sales during 2013 displayed a year-over-year growth rate of more than 50 percent.

Mobile users are becoming a major focus for any business that sells products online using debit card and credit card payment processing pages. Chris Mason, CEO and co-founder of Branding Brand, for example, recently reported that many organizations working with his company now see more than half of all visitors to their webpages accessing the pages via mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets.

“Many of our clients have already crossed the 50% mark for mobile traffic, and we expect almost all will get there by the end of this year,” Mason told Internet Retailer. “Consumers are spending more time on a multitude of mobile devices engaging with brands to make a purchase. Additionally, mobile devices are often used to research information for an in-store sale—this highlights how traditional bricks-and-mortar retailing is getting increasingly complex.”

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