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Digital interactions now inform in-store sales

April 30, 2014

For many businesses in retail and other industries, online credit card payment processing services are no longer considered separate from the point of sale systems used in stores.

For many businesses in retail and other industries, online credit card payment processing services are no longer considered separate from the point of sale systems used in stores. It’s clear that digital sales and in-store services need to work in tandem, rather than separately from one another. 

For instance, Pizza Hut recently opened a new website designed specifically to make it easier for consumers to pick up and place orders in regards to specific restaurant locations, according to Internet Retailer. A representative for the company noted that consumers are already demanding extensive digital options in regards to placing orders, interacting with the brand and conducting transactions via payment processing pages. 

“The rapid adoption of technology by our consumers has resulted in e-commerce growing rapidly month over month,” Baron Concors, chief digital officer at Pizza Hut, told the news outlet. “Our customers want the easiest way to order, and that’s through digital, so we must continually enhance our digital experiences.”

Digital interactions must mix with in-store services
Concors’ comments are mirrored by the results of a recent Deloitte Digital survey. Mobile Commerce Daily, summarizing the results, noted that more than 80 percent of consumers use their smartphones while shopping at in-store locations, illustrating the necessity of linking those devices to credit card payment processing services, or to the shopping experience itself.

Kasey Lobaugh, principal at Deloitte Consulting, told Mobile Commerce Daily that the company’s findings suggest that digital should not be considered a separate channel apart from in-store sales. Instead, digital needs to be integrated into the shopping experience.

“Digital isn’t a channel, but rather is fundamental to the entire retail enterprise,” Lobaugh told the news outlet. “This is a significant swing and requires a different organizational alignment and different prioritization, but it unleashes significant opportunity for the retail. However, this will require investment through the lens of the customer, not the channel.”

However, the investment into digital that Lobaugh advocates for is sure to pay off: he later noted that the conversion rates among shoppers who use smartphones in-store is much higher than the conversion rates among shoppers who do not.

“When consumers use digital as part of their in-store shopping process, including using smartphones in the store, the conversion rate goes up – by 40 percent,” Lobaugh told Mobile Commerce Daily. “This is contrary to conventional wisdom which would view in-store smartphone usage, often referred to as showrooming,  as a threat to bricks-and-mortal retailers.”

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