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Personalization is a key to success when it comes to e-commerce

February 11, 2014

If you're hoping to engage loyal consumers - either at a payment terminal in-store or at an online credit card payment processing page - then you need to be offering personalized service.

If you’re hoping to engage loyal consumers – either at a payment terminal in-store or at an online credit card payment processing page – then you need to be offering personalized service.

For example, Internet Retailer recently reported the findings of an Adroit Digital study which concluded that e-commerce websites that offer personalized service will be winning out during Valentine’s Day this year. Almost six out of every ten consumers currently prefer to buy Valentine’s Day gifts online, according to the report, specifically because e-commerce outlets are perceived as being more open toward personalized needs, and more likely to offer discounts. 

“Bombarding shoppers with irrelevant, one-size-fits-all messaging and offers will be the death of retailers this Valentine’s Day,” Daniel Toubian, a consultant at Maxymiser, told the news outlet. “People not only choose brands on the basis of experience, they also spend more with brands that offer better experiences.”

The results of a recent Accenture survey further back up these findings. The firm’s report noted that more than 20 percent of American consumers are planning to shop more at brick-and-mortar store locations in 2014 than they had in 2013. However, the firm noted that these consumers will be specifically attracted to retailers who make an effort to offer conveniences commonly found online to consumers who are shopping in-store.

“The survey results indicate that retailers have an opportunity to increase in-store sales but only if they make the experience worthwhile for consumers,” said Chris Donnelly, managing director of retail at Accenture.

For example, 19 percent of respondents to Accenture’s survey noted that they reserved or bought an item online, then picked it up in-store, more often in 2013 than they had in 2012. Additionally, 14 percent of shoppers are now often buying products in-store, and then having them shipped to them at home.

“Consumers are looking for the conveniences of shopping online, such as information on product availability, to be available in-store,” Donnelly said. “The lines between the different shopping channels are blurring, but the good news for traditional retailers is that the store continues to play an important role. In order to ensure that they offer shoppers a seamless retail experience, bricks and mortar/high street retailers must work hard to differentiate the shopping experience they offer compared to the online pure-plays.”

Accenture’s survey results indicate how merging the practices surrounding online payment processing transactions and those surrounding in-store sales can help a retailer to significantly boost revenue. 

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